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  • Sabatino De Angelis : Lost Wax Bronze Statue : Goddess Victory
  • Sabatino De Angelis : Lost Wax Bronze Statue : Goddess Victory
  • Sabatino De Angelis : Lost Wax Bronze Statue : Goddess Victory
  • Sabatino De Angelis : Lost Wax Bronze Statue : Goddess Victory
  • Sabatino De Angelis : Lost Wax Bronze Statue : Goddess Victory
  • Sabatino De Angelis : Lost Wax Bronze Statue : Goddess Victory
  • Sabatino De Angelis : Lost Wax Bronze Statue : Goddess Victory
  • Sabatino De Angelis : Lost Wax Bronze Statue : Goddess Victory

Sabatino De Angelis : Lost Wax Bronze Statue : Goddess Victory

Gallery Price: £8,900

This outstanding bronze statue was cast by Sabatino de Angelis et Fils using the ancient technique of lost wax casting from the original item in the National Museum of Naples.

Total Height: 71.75 inches

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This outstanding bronze statue was cast by Sabatino de Angelis et Fils using the ancient technique of lost wax casting from the original item in the National Museum of Naples. Listed among many bronze artefacts from Campanian cities buried by Vesuvius in The Field Museum of Natural History. The patina created on this masterpiece is truly beautiful and matches to perfection the ancient original from which it was cast. This wonderful piece has survived intact & on its original pedestal. The Goddess stands upon a Portoro Marble Sphere, set on a Giallo Antico Marble cube, this, in turn, rests upon a Portoro Marble revolving columnar pedestal. The whole is in excellent condition for their age.

Height From Base Of Giallo Antico To Top Of Bronze: 28 inches
Width From Wing Tip To Wing Tip: 18.75 inches
Diameter Of Pedestal Top: 10.75 inches
Width Of Pedestal Base: 12 inches
Height of Pedestal: 43.75 inches

Sabatino de Angelis et Fils

The Italian foundry of Sabatino de Angelis et Fils in Naples, was active in the 19th and early 20th Century. They were renowned for exclusively casting statues of famous antiquities in the Museo Nazionale di Napoli. Their bronze statues were cast using the lost wax method, exactly as the original Roman statues would have been and were given a variety of patinas to fully reflect the original versions.

Rare Important Marble

Giallo Antico Marble was one of the most favoured & highly sought marbles of the Romans, it was originally called Numidian Marble, as it came from Chemtou, ancient Simmithu, however, because of its beautiful yellow colour, Stonemasons of the Renaissance called it Giallo Antico. It is one of the finest & rarest marble & was only used on the finest of pieces in the 18th Century & 19th Century.

The Portoro or Marble of Portovenere is a polychrome rock amongst the most elegant in the world. Thanks to its colouration and figuring, it was considered among the finest materials & of great importance. Its exceptional characteristics combined with the fact it is one of the most highly decorative of marble, meant it was used inside grand buildings & churches throughout Rome & Europe. It is found exclusively in the province of La Spezia, Italy. Its colour is given from the abundant presence of organic substance; the golden striations are due to a partial process of dolomitization, oxidizing it & creating the most beautiful of figurations. Originally the marble Portoro was called “mischio yellow and black”, then it became known by that of “black jade of Portovenere”. Subsequently taking the name of the place from where it was extracted, or rather “marble of Portovenere”. Much later, after the French Republic had made Italy a Client State, it was called “marble Portoro” from the translation in Italian “porta oro” of the French denomination “porte d’or”.

The Goddess Victory

Goddess Victory, derived from the ancient Greek word Nike, pronounced ”Nee-key” and it is synonymous with the word ‘Victory’. Its origins are rooted in proto-Indo-European languages to mean ‘first’, ”victor” and ”afore” from ”Nikh”, pronounced ”neekh”. Nike in Latin is ‘Victoria’ and that is why the Romans called her Goddess Victoria and the English word ”Victory” derives from this Latin word, where she is also subsequently known as Goddess Victory. ”Victoria” itself derives from ”Vijaya” a word in the ancient Ayran language of Sanskrit. Unlike the Greek Nike, the Goddess Victoria was a major part of Roman society. Multiple temples were erected in her honour. When her statue was removed in 382 CE by Emperor Gratianus there was much anger in Rome. She was normally

Multiple temples were erected in her honour. When her statue was removed in 382 CE by Emperor Gratianus there was much anger in Rome. She was normally worshipped by triumphant generals returning from war. Also unlike the Greek Nike, who was known for success in athletic games such as chariot races, Victoria was a symbol of victory over death and determined who would be successful during a war. Victoria appears widely on Roman coins, jewellery, architecture and numerous other arts, such as this magnificent bronze sculpture figural example.

Lost Wax Casting Bronze Sculpture

Lost wax process, also called cire-perdue in France, is an ancient method of metal casting in which a molten metal is poured into a mould that has been created by means of a wax model. Once the mould is made, the wax model is melted and drained away. A hollow core can be effected by the introduction of a heat-proof core that prevents the molten metal from totally filling the mould. Common on every continent except Australia, the lost-wax method dates from the 3rd millennium BC and has sustained few changes since then.

Sabatino De Angelis : Goddess Victory : Links

The Grand Tour
Sculpture in the National Trust Collections
Philidelphia Museum of Art, USA 

Attributed to Michelangelo Maestri (Italian, d. 1812)

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Sabatino De Angelis : Lost Wax Bronze Statue : Goddess Victory

This outstanding bronze statue was cast by Sabatino de Angelis et Fils using the ancient technique of lost wax casting from the original item in the National Museum of Naples. Listed among many bronze artefacts from Campanian cities buried by Vesuvius in The Field Museum of Natural History. The patina created on this masterpiece is truly beautiful and matches to perfection the ancient original from which it was cast. This wonderful piece has survived intact & on its original pedestal. The Goddess stands upon a Portoro Marble Sphere, set on a Giallo Antico Marble cube, this, in turn, rests upon a Portoro Marble revolving columnar pedestal. The whole is in excellent condition for their age.

Height From Base Of Giallo Antico To Top Of Bronze: 28 inches
Width From Wing Tip To Wing Tip: 18.75 inches
Diameter Of Pedestal Top: 10.75 inches
Width Of Pedestal Base: 12 inches
Height of Pedestal: 43.75 inches

Sabatino de Angelis et Fils

The Italian foundry of Sabatino de Angelis et Fils in Naples, was active in the 19th and early 20th Century. They were renowned for exclusively casting statues of famous antiquities in the Museo Nazionale di Napoli. Their bronze statues were cast using the lost wax method, exactly as the original Roman statues would have been and were given a variety of patinas to fully reflect the original versions.

Rare Important Marble

Giallo Antico Marble was one of the most favoured & highly sought marbles of the Romans, it was originally called Numidian Marble, as it came from Chemtou, ancient Simmithu, however, because of its beautiful yellow colour, Stonemasons of the Renaissance called it Giallo Antico. It is one of the finest & rarest marble & was only used on the finest of pieces in the 18th Century & 19th Century.

The Portoro or Marble of Portovenere is a polychrome rock amongst the most elegant in the world. Thanks to its colouration and figuring, it was considered among the finest materials & of great importance. Its exceptional characteristics combined with the fact it is one of the most highly decorative of marble, meant it was used inside grand buildings & churches throughout Rome & Europe. It is found exclusively in the province of La Spezia, Italy. Its colour is given from the abundant presence of organic substance; the golden striations are due to a partial process of dolomitization, oxidizing it & creating the most beautiful of figurations. Originally the marble Portoro was called “mischio yellow and black”, then it became known by that of “black jade of Portovenere”. Subsequently taking the name of the place from where it was extracted, or rather “marble of Portovenere”. Much later, after the French Republic had made Italy a Client State, it was called “marble Portoro” from the translation in Italian “porta oro” of the French denomination “porte d’or”.

The Goddess Victory

Goddess Victory, derived from the ancient Greek word Nike, pronounced ”Nee-key” and it is synonymous with the word ‘Victory’. Its origins are rooted in proto-Indo-European languages to mean ‘first’, ”victor” and ”afore” from ”Nikh”, pronounced ”neekh”. Nike in Latin is ‘Victoria’ and that is why the Romans called her Goddess Victoria and the English word ”Victory” derives from this Latin word, where she is also subsequently known as Goddess Victory. ”Victoria” itself derives from ”Vijaya” a word in the ancient Ayran language of Sanskrit. Unlike the Greek Nike, the Goddess Victoria was a major part of Roman society. Multiple temples were erected in her honour. When her statue was removed in 382 CE by Emperor Gratianus there was much anger in Rome. She was normally

Multiple temples were erected in her honour. When her statue was removed in 382 CE by Emperor Gratianus there was much anger in Rome. She was normally worshipped by triumphant generals returning from war. Also unlike the Greek Nike, who was known for success in athletic games such as chariot races, Victoria was a symbol of victory over death and determined who would be successful during a war. Victoria appears widely on Roman coins, jewellery, architecture and numerous other arts, such as this magnificent bronze sculpture figural example.

Lost Wax Casting Bronze Sculpture

Lost wax process, also called cire-perdue in France, is an ancient method of metal casting in which a molten metal is poured into a mould that has been created by means of a wax model. Once the mould is made, the wax model is melted and drained away. A hollow core can be effected by the introduction of a heat-proof core that prevents the molten metal from totally filling the mould. Common on every continent except Australia, the lost-wax method dates from the 3rd millennium BC and has sustained few changes since then.

Sabatino De Angelis : Goddess Victory : Links

The Grand Tour
Sculpture in the National Trust Collections
Philidelphia Museum of Art, USA