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  • Antique Gate Leg Dining Table in Mahogany
  • Antique Gate Leg Dining Table in Mahogany
  • Antique Gate Leg Dining Table in Mahogany
  • Antique Gate Leg Dining Table in Mahogany
  • Antique Gate Leg Dining Table in Mahogany
  • Antique Gate Leg Dining Table in Mahogany

Antique Gate Leg Dining Table in Mahogany

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A fine and rare early 18th century George II Antique Gate Leg Dining Table of substantial proportions.

Sits 8 comfortably.

Height 70 cms 27.5ins
Width 157 cms 62ins
Depth 146 cms 57.5ins

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Georgian dining

During the eighteenth century, dining was an important part of socialising. Initially, the main meal was held at about 12 pm,   this gradually became later until about 7pm. Dinner was a lengthy and formal event that needed the flexibility antique Gate Leg Dining Tables offered. Guests were required to wear formal clothing, often meaning that a change of clothes was necessary beforehand. The theatre of dining provided people with the stage to exercise their wit and social skills.

Georgian dining involved a multitude of foods, sweetmeats, and drinks were served, which often meant that dining took a considerable amount of time. The Duke de la Rochefoucauld commented that,

“Dinner is one of the most wearisome of English experiences lasting, as it does four or five hours.”

Serving food at the table

Generally, the meal would consist of three courses: soup and fish, followed by cooked dishes, and completed by meats. After this, a dessert of jellies, sweetmeats and fruits would be served. The dominant style of Georgian dining during the eighteenth century was ‘service a la francaise’, which essentially dictated the entire meal to be laid out on the table – so that all components were within reach of each member of the dining party – and guests would either help themselves or be served by a footman.

‘Service a la Russe’ was introduced in Paris by the Russian Ambassador c.1810. This was different as the table was largely empty of food dishes, and instead serving courses individually one after the other. By the end of the nineteenth century, this was the most popular way of dining.

After dessert, the ladies would withdraw to the drawing room to prepare and serve tea, whilst the gentlemen smoked and drank port. The men may then join the ladies to play cards and entertain one another before going home.

Sociability was integral to Georgian dining, and the dining table was therefore one of the most important items of Georgian furniture.

Click here to see our Georgian Furniture Style Guide.

Attributed to Michelangelo Maestri (Italian, d. 1812)

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Antique Gate Leg Dining Table in Mahogany

Georgian dining

During the eighteenth century, dining was an important part of socialising. Initially, the main meal was held at about 12 pm,   this gradually became later until about 7pm. Dinner was a lengthy and formal event that needed the flexibility antique Gate Leg Dining Tables offered. Guests were required to wear formal clothing, often meaning that a change of clothes was necessary beforehand. The theatre of dining provided people with the stage to exercise their wit and social skills.

Georgian dining involved a multitude of foods, sweetmeats, and drinks were served, which often meant that dining took a considerable amount of time. The Duke de la Rochefoucauld commented that,

“Dinner is one of the most wearisome of English experiences lasting, as it does four or five hours.”

Serving food at the table

Generally, the meal would consist of three courses: soup and fish, followed by cooked dishes, and completed by meats. After this, a dessert of jellies, sweetmeats and fruits would be served. The dominant style of Georgian dining during the eighteenth century was ‘service a la francaise’, which essentially dictated the entire meal to be laid out on the table – so that all components were within reach of each member of the dining party – and guests would either help themselves or be served by a footman.

‘Service a la Russe’ was introduced in Paris by the Russian Ambassador c.1810. This was different as the table was largely empty of food dishes, and instead serving courses individually one after the other. By the end of the nineteenth century, this was the most popular way of dining.

After dessert, the ladies would withdraw to the drawing room to prepare and serve tea, whilst the gentlemen smoked and drank port. The men may then join the ladies to play cards and entertain one another before going home.

Sociability was integral to Georgian dining, and the dining table was therefore one of the most important items of Georgian furniture.

Click here to see our Georgian Furniture Style Guide.