Shop

  • William IV Irish Rosewood Library Table By Williams & Gibton
  • William IV Irish Rosewood Library Table By Williams & Gibton
  • William IV Irish Rosewood Library Table By Williams & Gibton
  • William IV Irish Rosewood Library Table By Williams & Gibton
  • William IV Irish Rosewood Library Table By Williams & Gibton
  • William IV Irish Rosewood Library Table By Williams & Gibton
  • William IV Irish Rosewood Library Table By Williams & Gibton
  • William IV Irish Rosewood Library Table By Williams & Gibton
  • William IV Irish Rosewood Library Table By Williams & Gibton
  • William IV Irish Rosewood Library Table By Williams & Gibton

William IV Irish Rosewood Library Table By Williams & Gibton

Gallery Price: £23,000

Williams and Gibton Rosewood library table. The table which has a beautiful rosewood top and two deep side drawers with blank drawer fronts opposite with turned knobs. The top is mounted on carved legs with scrolled feet in typical William IV style stamped with the makers ‘Williams & Gibton’.

Our library table is Identical (and restored) to another at Lissadell House,  Co. Sligo, Ireland. Please see the screenshot attached.

The firm of Mack, Williams and Gibton was formed around 1812, but its history can be traced to the latter part of the 18th century, when John Mack established a cabinet-making business in Abbey Street, Dublin. First recorded in 1784, Mack continued to trade alone from Abbey Street until 1800 and in 1801 placed an advertisement in The Dublin Evening Post. About this time he was joined by another cabinet-maker, Robert Gibton, who had established his own business a few years earlier, trading at first from Aungier Street, where he is recorded between 1790 and 1796, and afterwards from Stephen Street where he is recorded in 1800. Trade directories reveal that in addition to cabinet-making, Gibton also worked as an auctioneer, while his trade label, a copy of which survives on a deed box in the National Museum, Dublin, indicates that he was likewise a maker and seller of trunks, portmanteaus, gun cases and musical instrument cases. The partnership of Mack and Gibton flourished. By 1803 the business had moved to larger premises in Stafford Street, and in 1805 the partnership was formalized. The following year Mack and Gibton received the ultimate accolade, being appointed ‘Upholsterers & Cabinet Makers to his Majesty, His Excellency the Lord Lieutentant, and His Majesty’s Board of works.’ In 1812 Robert Gibton died and was succeeded by his son William Gibton ( 1789-1842 ). At the same time, a former apprentice, Zachariah Williams, who had married Robert Gibton’s daughter, joined the management, thus creating the new partnership of Mack, Williams and Gibton. Under this name the firm enjoyed unparalleled success. Mack, Williams and Gibton retained its Royal Warrant for many years, supplying and restoring furniture for some of the most important public buildings in Ireland, including the Four Courts, the War Office, the Barracks Office, Dublin Castle, the Chapel Royal, and the Treasury and Viceregal Lodge. At the same time the firm undertook commissions for several major Irish country houses, such as Ballynegall, Co. Westmeath, Oakley Park Co. Meath, and Strokestown, Co. Roscommon. Following the death of John Mack in 1829, the firm continued to trade under the names of the surviving partners, Williams and Gibton, and in 1844, two years after the death of William Gibton, it again changed its name to Williams and Sons, finally ceasing business in 1852.

Attributed to Michelangelo Maestri (Italian, d. 1812)

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from nicholaswells.com

You have Successfully Subscribed!

William IV Irish Rosewood Library Table By Williams & Gibton

The firm of Mack, Williams and Gibton was formed around 1812, but its history can be traced to the latter part of the 18th century, when John Mack established a cabinet-making business in Abbey Street, Dublin. First recorded in 1784, Mack continued to trade alone from Abbey Street until 1800 and in 1801 placed an advertisement in The Dublin Evening Post. About this time he was joined by another cabinet-maker, Robert Gibton, who had established his own business a few years earlier, trading at first from Aungier Street, where he is recorded between 1790 and 1796, and afterwards from Stephen Street where he is recorded in 1800. Trade directories reveal that in addition to cabinet-making, Gibton also worked as an auctioneer, while his trade label, a copy of which survives on a deed box in the National Museum, Dublin, indicates that he was likewise a maker and seller of trunks, portmanteaus, gun cases and musical instrument cases. The partnership of Mack and Gibton flourished. By 1803 the business had moved to larger premises in Stafford Street, and in 1805 the partnership was formalized. The following year Mack and Gibton received the ultimate accolade, being appointed ‘Upholsterers & Cabinet Makers to his Majesty, His Excellency the Lord Lieutentant, and His Majesty’s Board of works.’ In 1812 Robert Gibton died and was succeeded by his son William Gibton ( 1789-1842 ). At the same time, a former apprentice, Zachariah Williams, who had married Robert Gibton’s daughter, joined the management, thus creating the new partnership of Mack, Williams and Gibton. Under this name the firm enjoyed unparalleled success. Mack, Williams and Gibton retained its Royal Warrant for many years, supplying and restoring furniture for some of the most important public buildings in Ireland, including the Four Courts, the War Office, the Barracks Office, Dublin Castle, the Chapel Royal, and the Treasury and Viceregal Lodge. At the same time the firm undertook commissions for several major Irish country houses, such as Ballynegall, Co. Westmeath, Oakley Park Co. Meath, and Strokestown, Co. Roscommon. Following the death of John Mack in 1829, the firm continued to trade under the names of the surviving partners, Williams and Gibton, and in 1844, two years after the death of William Gibton, it again changed its name to Williams and Sons, finally ceasing business in 1852.

  • Selection Required: Select product options above before making new offer.
  • Offer Sent! Your offer has been received and will be processed as soon as possible.
  • Error: There was an error sending your offer, please try again. If this problem persists, please contact us.

Make an Offer

To make an offer please complete the form below:


£






£
Please wait...