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  • Important Oval Centre Table Attributed to Holland & Sons
  • Important Oval Centre Table Attributed to Holland & Sons
  • Important Oval Centre Table Attributed to Holland & Sons
  • Important Oval Centre Table Attributed to Holland & Sons
  • Important Oval Centre Table Attributed to Holland & Sons
  • Important Oval Centre Table Attributed to Holland & Sons

Important Oval Centre Table Attributed to Holland & Sons

Gallery Price: £58,000

  • – One of the finest pieces of 19th Century English furniture ever made
  • – An exhibition quality masterpiece
  • – Incorporating the most fabulous & highly prized timbers throughout, including one of the most incredible Thuya Wood,  Circassian Walnut, Tulipwood & with Satinwood, Holly & Ebony inlays
  • – Solid Goncalo Alves Legs
  • – Firmly attributed to Holland and Sons – Suppliers to the Royal Household

England, circa 1860

Height: 29.25 inches
Width: 54 inches
Depth: 39.5 inches

The original firm was founded in 1803 as cabinetmakers and upholsterers by partners William Holland and Stephen Taprell, trading as Taprell & Holland until 1835, Taprell, Holland & Sons until 1843 and Holland & Sons after 1843. By 1851 the firm employed over 350 men and in 1852 it incorporated the prestigious firm of Thomas Dowbiggin (1788-1854), taking over its Mount Street premises. Holland & Sons received commissions for furnishing many of the government buildings and clubs built in nineteenth-century London including the Athenaeum, the Reform Club and the British Museum. The firm also worked on many royal commissions for Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, making furniture for Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle, Osborne House, and Balmoral.

Royal Collection

Important Oval Centre Table Attributed to Holland & Sons

The original firm was founded in 1803 as cabinetmakers and upholsterers by partners William Holland and Stephen Taprell, trading as Taprell & Holland until 1835, Taprell, Holland & Sons until 1843 and Holland & Sons after 1843. By 1851 the firm employed over 350 men and in 1852 it incorporated the prestigious firm of Thomas Dowbiggin (1788-1854), taking over its Mount Street premises. Holland & Sons received commissions for furnishing many of the government buildings and clubs built in nineteenth-century London including the Athenaeum, the Reform Club and the British Museum. The firm also worked on many royal commissions for Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, making furniture for Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle, Osborne House, and Balmoral.

Royal Collection